CoatingsPro Magazine

NOV 2016

CoatingsPro offers an in-depth look at coatings based on case studies, successful business operation, new products, industry news, and the safe and profitable use of coatings and equipment.

Issue link: http://coatingspromag.epubxp.com/i/747279

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 53 of 68

COATINGSPRO NOVEMBER 2016 53 experience in the commercial market and even less experience with coatings. e best description of the issues that he could offer me was that the floor coating " just didn't look right." My initial thought, since he hasn't really been exposed to these products, is that he simply did not know what to expect. In other words, the coating system is probably fine but it does not look like what they thought it would look like. at's fair enough. Skewed expecta- tions are one thing, but this turned out to be something else. e next step was to gather and review the project documents to help shed some light on the project. e initial contract between the owner and the coating contractor was simple enough: install the floor coating according to the manufacturer's published installation instructions. And the manufacturer's published installation instructions were just as simple: complete concrete moisture testing, shot blast the existing floor surface, prepare control joints and honor construction joints, and prepare concrete cracks. Requirements for the coating application were equally as basic: spread the slurry coat to the desired thickness, complete power troweling, and pour, squeegee, and back roll the final coating. is seemed to be a very nice little job that only required the minimum, and yet somehow the result still wasn't what the client wanted. I had reviewed all the literature provided, giving me a good background about the issues that I was likely to encounter on the jobsite. After the introductions and some perfunctory comments, the group walked around and looked at the floors. After all, I was the only one who hadn't yet set foot on the property. With everyone's assent, I walked the project, making sure to vary my viewing angles to account for changes in light and shadows. Here's what I noticed: 1. Mortar voids. Voids occur in freshly placed mortar that is troweled. The blades of the power trowel will sometimes pull up small sections of the mortar, leaving behind areas lacking mortar, or holes, at the surface. Typically, to mitigate any poten- tial voids, an applicator keeps the power trowel fairly close to the screed box, run by a second appli- cator, while a third applicator runs between the two, filling in any of these torn areas. 2. Streaking. This visual issue most frequently occurs due to a lack of back rolling from the applicator. Most coatings are poured over the floor, and then a crew member uses a squeegee to distribute the material. Because the squeegee leaves marks where the coating flows around the squeegee's ends, back rolling removes these lines, creating a uniform surface appearance. 3. Undulations. The look of waves in the floor most often occur because the underlying concrete has waves it in, but in some cases, failure to properly overlap the trowel path can create similar undulations in the floor coating. Regardless of the reason behind the waves in the flooring, it should have been addressed by the contractor. Mortar tears/voids Voids occur in freshly placed mortar that is troweled. The blades of the power trowel will sometimes pull up small sections of the mortar, leaving behind areas lacking mortar, or holes, at the surface. Inadequate Warehouse Floor

Articles in this issue

Archives of this issue

view archives of CoatingsPro Magazine - NOV 2016