CoatingsPro Magazine Supplements

ROOF 2018

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10 ROOF COATINGS 2018 COATINGSPROMAG.COM In this phase, Mahaff ey also advises contractors to consider power requirements, especially on new construc- tion projects. "Are they running off a generator, or are they trying to tie into the local power? Running off the genera- tor gives them more control because it's typically their own gear, so they know it and it's properly sized. If they're trying to run off the local power or shore power, they need to check voltages and make sure they have the correct voltage to run the system." For the roof coatings themselves, those typically come in 5-gallon (18.9 L) buckets, 55-gallon (208.2 L) drums, and 275-gallon (1,041.0 L) totes, said Kemper's Arnold, noting these can be dropped on the roof via a crane. Other methods may also be used, though, depending on the jobsite and the selected application equipment. "Some manufacturers provide semi-truck tankers," Arnold said. "Sometimes you' ll leave the spray rig in the parking lot, and then the hose runs up the side of the building." "I've seen roofi ng materials elevated to the roof using everything from freight elevators to forklifts to helicop- ters," added Icynene-Lapolla's Kramer. "Not necessarily just coatings, but membranes or other things. If you can't get on top of a roof, you may have to use smaller buckets. But the ideal would be to spray out of drums. ere are diff erent-sized pumps to run longer lines that allow you to keep most every- thing on the ground." Waste disposal may be a separate element of the access plan. e RB4000 lift from Equipter, sometimes called the Roofer's Buggy, is a self-propelled trailer that allows roofers to throw debris directly into its raised container instead of dropping it to the ground. e Smart Chute from Quantum Smart Solutions, LLC can be of similar assistance by sending debris directly into the debris Dumpster or truck. To protect crew members, the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) advises contractors to perform a job hazard analysis (JHA) before starting any job to identify and create a plan to manage any potential risks. If risks can't be engineered out of the project, proper personal protective equipment (PPE) may need to be worn by the crew members. But because every job is diff erent, the PPE will vary based on the roof conditions, products installed, and application equipment used. Slip resistance is one key consideration, since freshly applied coatings have the potential to lead to slip and fall accidents. To avoid this, contractors walking backward when applying — away from the new coating — should have other crew members watching to alert them if they are too close to an edge. Proper footwear and eye protection are neces- sary on many rooftop coatings jobsites, along with respira- tors and supplied air hoods if using certain types of complex spray equipment. Regardless of the application equipment used, fall protection is often the biggest concern, particularly when working near a roof 's edge. Harnesses, lanyards, and perime- ter lines are popular protection techniques, with key provid- ers including MSA, Honeywell 's Miller Fall Protection, and DBI-SALA by Capital Safety (part of 3M's fall protection division). One new solution that was introduced in 2018 is MSA's V-EDGE web personal fall limiter, which features a lifeline made of webbing instead of the typically used cable. is allows the product to weigh 15 percent less than tradi- tional alternatives, enabling users to work more comfortably for longer periods. And fall protection isn't just about the safety of the worker in danger of falling. Falling objects are a related consideration given the lofty heights of many rooftop jobsites, particularly if any other crew members or pedestri- ans are on the ground. In 2016, the most recent year with data available, more than 250 fatalities and nearly 48,000 reported injuries occurred due to dropped objects, accord- ing to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. To address this, the International Safety Equipment Association (ISEA) and American National Standards Institute (ANSI) recently developed a new standard Laying down the coating, such as Momentive's silicone, isn't the only concern for the coatings applicator. Ensuring that the crew is working safely, such as wearing the proper personal protective equipment (PPE). Working at heights also means added precautions regarding fall protection. A new solution in this area for 2018 is MSA's V-EDGE web personal fall limiter, which uses webbing instead of the typical cable lifeline. ans are on the ground. In 2016, the most recent year with data available, more than 250 fatalities and nearly 48,000 reported injuries occurred due to dropped objects, accord- ing to the U.S. Bureau National Standards Institute (ANSI) recently developed a new standard Roofing Projects

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