CoatingsPro Magazine Supplements

SURFACE 2015

CoatingsPro offers an in-depth look at coatings based on case studies, successful business operation, new products, industry news, and the safe and profitable use of coatings and equipment.

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30 SURFACEPREP 2015 COATINGSPROMAG.COM Roof Surface Prep traditional R-panel type roof. • Skylights, penetrations, and any other detail work needs to be completed at this time as well. At this point, your project should be waterproofed and ready to receive its protective layers. Tis will vary based on substrate, system, and manufacturer. Spray Polyurethane Foam Roofs Another substrate you may encounter with roof coatings is spray polyurethane foam (SPF). Particular attention needs to be paid when applying a new maintenance coat over SPF. For instance, SPF does not like sunlight; UV rays can start breaking down the cell structure in just hours. If you are working on a SPF roof that has exposed foam, it will need to be scarifed at least an inch to get to "good " foam that has not been deteriorated by the sun. Only the areas that were exposed need to be scarifed, and new foam will need to be applied to replace scarifed foam. Te amount of foam you scarifed will determine how you go about replacing it, and for larger areas (i.e., more than 400–500 square feet, or 37–46 m²), I would recommend having the area foamed by an SPF contractor. Areas smaller than 400 square feet (37 m²) can be done cost efectively with a froth pack. Remember! Be sure with all surface prep, whether on a metal, SPF, or other type of roof, it is crucial to pay attention to proper safety precautions. Wear all proper safety gear, which may include fall arrest systems, respirators, and protective suits. And remember: Te devil is in the details! Spend your time on the details, and your next recoating roof job should go smoother, look better, and last longer. CP Scott Gayle is t he nat iona l sa les manager at A mer ican Weat herStar. He has been in t he bu i ld ing mater ia ls indust r y for more t han 25 years, and he has been specif ica l ly involved in roof ing mater ia ls for t he past 15 years. A mer ican Weat herStar is a member of t he Roof Coat ings Manufact urers A ssociat ion (RCM A), t he nat iona l t rade associat ion represent ing manufact urers of cold-ap- pl ied protect ive roof coat ings and cements and indust r y suppl iers. The RCM A and t he Ref lect ive Roof Coat ings Inst it ute (R RCI) have merged into one indus- t r y associat ion t hat cont inues to advance t he nat iona l and inter nat iona l market for roof coat ings. For add it iona l infor mat ion on RCM A , contact: w w w.roofcoat- ings.org. For more infor mat ion on t he ar t ic le, contact: Scott Gayle, (800) 771-6643, sgayle@weat herstar.net Once you deal with penetration details, such as the vent shown here, your project should be ready to receive its protective layers. The substrate, system, and manufacturer will determine what layers are necessary. Remember: On any coatings job, it is crucial to wear all proper safety gear. On at-height jobs in particular, such as on roofs, consider fall arrest systems, respirators, and protective suits. Paying particular attention to the details of the surface prep on your next recoating roof job just may help it go smoother, look better, and last longer. After all: The devil is in the details!

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