CoatingsPro Magazine Supplements

SURFACE 2015

CoatingsPro offers an in-depth look at coatings based on case studies, successful business operation, new products, industry news, and the safe and profitable use of coatings and equipment.

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10 SURFACEPREP 2015 COATINGSPROMAG.COM Surface Prep By Jennifer Frakes Photos Courtesy of A x x iom, Bar ton, Blast rac, Clemco, EDCO, HoldTight, Sponge-Jet, and Wheelaborator Concrete and Steel: An In-Depth Look at Surface Preparation C oncrete and steel are two common substrates that receive protective coating systems. Difering in almost every way — concrete is made of Portland cement, water, and aggregate, while steel is an alloy of iron and carbon — they do have one common trait: Both must receive proper surface preparation for the success- ful adhesion of coatings. Understanding how to prepare concrete and steel substrates and knowing which surface preparation methods are best suited for each surface can mean the diference between a coating system installation victory and a prema- ture failure of epic proportions. For the purpose of this article, CoatingsPro Magazine enlisted the help of a number of specialists to gather information about the wide world of surface preparation, the importance of proper surface prep in the coatings industry, and the various methods, products, and equipment that are available for use on concrete and steel substrates. Although it is by no means exhaustive, the techniques and products discussed in this article serve as a starting point for coatings applicators who are hoping to gain a better knowledge of how to properly prepare concrete and steel substrates. Words to Live by for Coatings Contractors Surface preparation is a hot topic within the coatings indus- try these days. Studies from government agencies and indus- try experts seem to agree that poor surface preparation is responsible for well over half of the incidences of coatings system failures. In fact, some studies attribute anywhere from 68 to 83 percent of coatings failures to improper or inadequate surface preparation. Most importantly, these studies have found that these premature coatings failures could have been prevented if only the substrate had been properly prepared in the frst place. Here at CoatingsPro Magazine, these numbers are not at all surprising. Aside from jobsite safety, surface preparation has long been considered by industry leaders as one of the Understanding how to prepare concrete and steel substrates and knowing which surface preparation methods are best suited for each surface can mean the diference between a coating system installation victory and a premature failure of epic proportions. Concrete, made of Portland cement, water, and aggregate, may require different types of surface prep, including cleaning and profiling, depending on its use. Different types of machines can help, including the EDCO grinder shown here.

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