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ROOF COATINGS NOV 2016

CoatingsPro offers an in-depth look at coatings based on case studies, successful business operation, new products, industry news, and the safe and profitable use of coatings and equipment.

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6 ROOF COATINGS 2016 COATINGSPROMAG.COM By Jennifer Frakes Photos Courtesy of 838 Coatings, Gaco Western, The Garland Company, Inc., IR Analyzers, Oak Ridge Foam and Coating S y s t e m s I n c . , P r o g r e s s i v e M a t e r i a l s , R o o f C o a t i n g s Manufacturers Association, RM Lucas Applying Up High With High-Performance Coatings C oatings jobs can be challenging regardless of location, but when the work takes place on a roof, there are many additional variables to consider. With the help of some industry experts, this article will take an in-depth look at some of the unique circumstances that surround applying coatings and/or spray polyurethane foam (SPF) on rooftops, including logistics, accessibility, safety and fall protection, substrate type, surface preparation and repair, roof inspection, application methods, materials, environmentally friendly options, and industry standards. Read on for the 411 on what's up when it comes to rooftop coating application. Getting Into the Roof Mindset First, it is important to note that coating systems are becom- ing more and more popular as a long-lasting solution to extend the life of existing roofs. "One of the best things about roof restoration is not having the fear of opening up the roof to the elements. As compared to a full roof replace- ment, which involves a full tear-off, coating application is much more environmentally friendly and economical for the owner," said Chris Feldman of 838 Coatings. With this being said, applying coatings and SPF to rooftop areas is a complicated business. One of the main differences between roof coating projects and other kinds of coating projects is in the mindset of the contractor. " To be a successful roof coating contractor, the crew must have a waterproofing mentality and an understanding of how to repair existing roof substrates," said Fred Wolfe of the Roof Coatings Guild of America (RCGA). W hile all coating projects require contractors to under- stand coverage rates, ratios, and similar quality control measures, roof coaters must also prepare a wide variety of substrates for proper application of coatings. Roof coating details must also be uniquely suited for movement, as the expansion and contraction of roofs can test the limits of a protective coating. According to Rich Franklin of Oak Ridge Foam and Coating Systems, roof coating applicators must examine the requirements of each specific roof area and select the materials based on many factors, including the building owner's needs. ese factors may include waterproofing requirements, added Roof Coatings First, it is important to note that coating systems are becoming more and more popular as a long-lasting solution to extend the life of existing roofs. Coating a roof can be challenging yet rewarding. "One of the best things about roof restoration is not having the fear of opening up the roof to the elements," said Chris Feldman of 838 Coatings.

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