CoatingsPro Magazine Supplements

ROOF COATINGS NOV 2016

CoatingsPro offers an in-depth look at coatings based on case studies, successful business operation, new products, industry news, and the safe and profitable use of coatings and equipment.

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COATINGSPRO ROOF COATINGS 2016 7 insulation, poor roof drainage, structural defects, non-func- tioning roof mounted accessories, performance expectations, site conditions, and overall surfaces and their use (e.g., foot traffic or chemical fallout from a building's manufacturing process or surrounding environmental factors). It also can't be forgotten that roof coating systems are installed outside, which brings a significant weather compo- nent to a construction project. " Temperature, rain, mist, fog, relative humidity, hail, and snow are many of the hurdles that many non-roofing coating projects don't encounter. is affects site logistics, roof access, and schedules, both daily and long-term. A lso, working at heights brings into safety issues that, again, other non-roofing coating projects don't encounter," explained Jim Kirby of Roof Coatings Manufacturers Association (RCMA). Accessibility and Safety Before any work on a rooftop takes place, accessibility must be addressed. "Access can be a logistical challenge, depending on the type of building in question. Contractors may have to use elevators, stairways, boom lifts, or tall ladders to gain access to the roof," explained Jon Henson of GAF. In addition, roofing contractors are governed by strict Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements in all aspects of the project. Roofing, as compared to other surface coating projects, demands that the materials are safely delivered to the jobsite that is often many stories high. On large roof coating /SPF projects, that means not only safe deliver y of the materials but also the spray equipment and other tools. "If coatings or SPF are spray applied, oftentimes the rig w ill be left on the ground at a staging area. If this is the case, there needs to be a crew member dedicated to tending the rig," said Lori Nelson of Gaco Western. A nd if it is decided that the materials and equipment need to be on the roof itself, a crane or a specialized lift designed to carr y heav y loads may be a necessar y piece of equipment. A nother point to consider is that many roof coating jobs are per for med whi le the bui ld ing is occupied. " T his means that specia l attention needs to be paid to accommo - date the tenants in the bui ld ing. Stag ing , repairs, f umes, noise, overspray, H VAC ( heating , venti lation, and air cond itioning ) and overa l l d isr uptions shou ld be rev iewed High-Performance Roof Coatings Roof coating contractors must understand additional requirements, such as waterproofing. "Also, working at heights brings into safety issues that, again, other non-roofing coating projects don't encounter," explained Jim Kirby of Roof Coatings Manufacturers Association (RCMA).

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