CoatingsPro Magazine Supplements

Concrete Dec 2017

CoatingsPro offers an in-depth look at coatings based on case studies, successful business operation, new products, industry news, and the safe and profitable use of coatings and equipment.

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8 CONCRETE COVERED 2017 COATINGSPROMAG.COM By Ben DuBose Photos Courtesy of 3M Personal Safet y Division, Bosch Power To o l s , F l o wc re t e A m e r i c a s , L AT IC R E T E I n t e r n a t i o n a l , Inc., Lig nomat US A Ltd., Marco, Nukote Coat ing Systems Inte r n a t ion a l , Pa u l N. G a rd ne r Co., S e y mou r Mid we s t , Sher win-Williams P rotec t ive & Mar ine Coat ings, Tnemec Company Inc., Tramex Meters, Westcoat Specialt y Coating Systems, and W. R. Meadows Cementing Success: How Contractors Can Navigate Concrete Projects C oncrete can be a complex substrate for many coatings contractors to deal with. It is popular around the world as a structural material — owing to its cost-effective, strong, and durable properties — and its applications can range from simple driveways to massive bridges and showcase floors all the way to roof decks. Nonetheless, concrete's versatility can also create its own set of problems. For starters, it is inherently a porous substrate, which makes even new pours vulnerable to moisture ingress. Additionally, heav y use, constant wear and tear, and exposure to outside elements can pose significant rehabilitation challenges for older slabs. "W hen you think about concrete in a nutshell and where it is in the world, it's everywhere," said Geoff Paine, product developer at coatings manufacturer Rust-Oleum. "Sidewalks, roads, driveways, foundation walls, basements, building walls — it's everywhere. We've got lots and lots of square footage and opportunities to seal or treat concrete." As a result, the process of treating a concrete surface is usually more complex for a contractor than simply choosing and applying a new coating or sealant. Strategies to comply with industry standards and safety protocols can be critical, along with knowledge of related phases that could be neces- sary on any job, such as moisture measurement, localized repairs, surface preparation, application tools, and even inspection equipment. "If you walk through concrete as a substrate, one thing that is predictable is that it's unpredictable," said Ben Sieben, vice president of marketing and research and development for Seal-Krete, part of the Rust-Oleum family. "If you don't take care of it, it's set up to fail." To assist with this process, CoatingsPro spoke with indus- try experts across all of these areas to get the inside scoop on what coatings contractors should consider across each possi- ble phase of a concrete project, along with a few of the numer- ous potential solutions. Safety First Before starting any job, contractors should take proper safety precautions. If safety concerns can't be engineered out of the project, then other steps should be taken, such as the use of personal protective equipment (PPE). For concrete substrates, this can include items such as respiratory protection, protec- tive clothing, gloves, goggles, boots, and hard hats in general and fall protection when working at heights. Companies such as Bullard, 3M, TurtleSkin by Warwick Mills, Ty vek by DuPont, and Guardian Fall Protection are among the many viable suppliers of those items. In 2017, regulator y standards aimed at promoting safe operations were raised higher than ever — with implica- tions for both PPE and the coating products themselves. As one example, updated U.S. Leadership in Energ y and Environmental Design (LEED) building standards continue to demand products that are low in odor and volatile organic compounds ( VOCs). "LEED v4 provides even higher scrutiny on bottled chemicals in coatings," said Casey Ball, regional market segment director for the flooring business at coatings manufacturer Sherwin-Williams. "It's a push for us as manufacturers to develop products that will meet these tighter regulations. We're trying to develop low-VOC, water-based, or otherwise [safer] products that meet VOC regulations while still providing the same performance as Concrete Covered Strategies to comply with industry standards and safety protocols can be critical, along with knowledge of related phases that could be necessary on any job, such as moisture measurement, localized repairs, surface preparation, application tools, and even inspection equipment.

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