CoatingsPro Magazine

MAY 2018

CoatingsPro offers an in-depth look at coatings based on case studies, successful business operation, new products, industry news, and the safe and profitable use of coatings and equipment.

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COATINGSPRO MAY 2018 45 smelly goo." As many coating professionals know from firsthand experi- ence, abrasive blasting 4,000 square feet (371.6 m²), including perimeter trough, of mystery epoxy stuck to decades-old steel can be tough. And it was! But Carlisle was prepared for that. In addition to his four-man crew, Carlisle brought in a four-man team of highly skilled abrasive blasters, all longtime friends from the Texas oilfield industry. "Poly Seal fills a niche as a premium polyurea company," said Carlisle. "ere are a lot of rabbit trails you can run down, and some make sense. But keeping a crew of 15 people busy between big jobs almost doesn't make sense. I have a lot of good relationships with blast crews and other professionals, and I try to build those relationships because you never know when you're going to need help. At the end of the day, you need to get the job done for the customer." e four Texans jumped right in: one blasting, one direct- ing the blast (and resting up for the next turn at the nozzle), one tending hose, and one tending the blast pot. Firing a recyclable Abrasive blasting was first. Not only was the existing epoxy bare but high winds wreaked havoc. That meant they crew had to use a Brush- Off Blast Cleaning to remove flash rust after the storm. Overall surface prep was done to achieve NACE No. 2/ Society for Protective Coatings (SSPC) Surface Preparation (SP) 10: Near-White Blast Cleaning to achieve a ~4-mil (101.6 microns) anchor profile. JOB AT A GLANCE PROJECT: Apply a monolithic polyurea coating system to the interior walls of a 39,000-gallon (147,631.1 L) steel wastewater clarifier serving a major potato production facility in Idaho COATINGS CONTRACTOR: Poly Seal 455 S Kings Rd. Nampa, ID 83686 (208) 960-0034 www.polysealidaho.com SIZE OF CONTRACTOR: 4-10 full-time employees SIZE OF CREW: 4 crew members PRIME CLIENT: J. R. Simplot Co. 1099 W Front St. Boise, ID 93702 (208) 336-2110 www.simplot.com SUBSTRATE: Steel CONDITION OF SUBSTRATE: Overall good SIZE OF JOB: ~4,000 sq. ft. (371.6 m²) DURATION: 14 days UNUSUAL FACTORS/CHALLENGES: » The existing epoxy coating was a mystery and required the use of an additional abrasive blast team from the Texas oilfields to remove it. » A rain storm was predicted to hit the site, but instead 30 to 40 mph (48.3-64.4 kph) winds came through and ripped off the protective tarps. » Coating the trough required special effort to angle the Fusion gun. MATERIALS/PROCESSES: » Had the client drain, dry, and clean the tank » Abrasive blasted interior tank walls and perimeter trough to NACE No. 2/Society for Protective Coatings (SSPC) Surface Preparation (SP) 10: Near-White Blast Cleaning to a ~4-mil (101.6 microns) anchor profile » Blasted to NACE No. 4/SSPC-SP-7: Brush-Off Blast Cleaning to knock off flash rust after the wind storm » Welded areas that were rough to smooth them » Spray applied 80-100 mils (2,032.0-2,540.0 microns) dry film thickness (DFT) of SPI Polyshield HT 100F polyurea coating to the tank and its trough » Power washed weir parts SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS: » Held daily safety meetings with client » Wore personal protective equipment (PPE), including Tyvek suits, gloves, air-supplied hooded respirators, dust masks, long-sleeved shirts, eyewear, and ear protection as necessary

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